Hydrogen staff teamed up with Muscular Dystrophy Association of Singapore (MDAS) to help the charity raise awareness of the challenges faced by MD patients.

September 15, 2016

A number of our recruitment consultants teamed up with Muscular Dystrophy Association of Singapore (MDAS) to help the charity raise awareness of the challenges faced by MD patients.

In conjunction with MDAS’ 15th anniversary, the event also educated the general public about the organisation’s work through encouraging individuals to experience of the realities of living with the disability. Games booths such as the ‘wheelchair challenge’ allowed the general public to gain first-hand experience of using a wheelchair. With different activities set, many individuals found the games challenging and some people gave up halfway through. Hydrogen’s volunteers played their part by offering assistance to members of the public by pushing their wheelchairs around the games route. The games presented real-life experiences to both the general public and the volunteers and taught everyone the importance of including those who are wheelchair bound.

The day also raised essential funds, as MDAS hosted a carnival that involved stage performances, game stations and opportunities to win an assortment of prizes. Students from the Association for Persons with Special Needs (APSN) also presented an outstanding Latin dance stage performance. 

The programme ended with members of MDAS conducting a musical performance and a sing-a-long with the crowd. 

Overall, the day was a success and enjoyed by all. Not only did it encourage individuals to gain a better understanding of the everyday challenges faced by wheelchair users, it taught everyone to further appreciate their physical well-being.  

Background information:

Originating in March 2000, MDAS is a self-help organisation that empowers people with muscular dystrophy (MD) and their families. MD is an umbrella term used to refer to a group of muscular disorders characterised by muscle weakness, wasting and contractures, which are usually progressive in nature and sometimes even life-threatening. While most of these disorders manifest in childhood, some may have an adult onset. Over time, a person with MD may lose the ability to walk, and ultimately face difficulties in breathing. At present, there is no known cure for MD.